Togetherness: We are each other’s keepers, we all become happier.

Togetherness: We are each other’s keepers, we all become happier. ufabet.

Togetherness

Togetherness

Turning streets into communities Perth, Australia: Using the wisdom of The Little Prince, Shani, a young Canadian woman, turned a street into a community by introducing pizza nights, movie nights, herb gardens and goats, through asking people to dream of what kind of street they would like to live in. 

Our language shapes our behaviour

Our language shapes our behaviour

From motor city to garden city Detroit, USA: After the financial crisis which destroyed the economy in Detroit, people have started to revitalize the city by transforming it from a ‘motor city’ into a ‘garden city’. Urban community gardens have been established throughout the city, which is currently one of the world’s biggest urban agricultural movements.

Moai Okinawa, Japan: Home to some of the healthiest people in the world, where many live to over a hundred years old. Some suggest it has to do with moai, which means to ‘come together in a common purpose’. It is a solid part of Okinawan tradition to create small, secure social networks in which members commit to each other for life. Moai is created when a child is born and helps to integrate the child into a lifelong community. Whether you face serious problems in life, economic struggle, sickness or grief over the loss of a loved one, the moai will be there.

Día de los Muertos Mexico: The Day of the Dead celebrations take place between 28 October and 2 November each year. The belief is that, on this day, the deceased have divine permission to visit friends and relatives on earth. People visit the graves of families and friends, taking food and drink with them. The events are a celebration of life rather than a sober mourning of its passing and create a sense of togetherness even with lost ones.

It takes a village to raise a child Western Africa: The proverb ‘It takes a village to raise a child’ exists in many different African languages but is sometimes said to have originated in Igbo and Yoruba, which are spoken in Western Africa.

Our language shapes our behaviour – and the proverb is a reminder that if we honour the notion that we are each other’s keepers, we all become happier.